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Homer

Found 90 thoughts of Homer

There is nothing nobler or more admirable than when two people who see eye to eye keep house as man and wife, confounding their enemies and delighting their friends.

Homer

There is nothing worse for mortals than a wandering life.

Homer

The fates have given mankind a patient soul.

Homer

Young men's minds are always changeable, but when an old man is concerned in a matter, he looks both before and after.

Homer

Sing, Muse, of the anger of Achilles, son of Peleus...

Homer

I should rather labor as another's serf, in the home of a man without fortune, one whose livelihood was meager, than rule over all the departed dead.

Homer

It is not possible to fight beyond your strength, even if you strive.

Homer

A generation of men is like a generation of leaves; the wind scatters some leaves upon the ground, while others the burgeoning wood brings forth - and the season of spring comes on. So of men one generation springs forth and another ceases.

Homer

The wine urges me on, the bewitching wine, which sets even a wise man to singing and to laughing gently and rouses him up to dance and brings forth words which were better unspoken.

Homer

Do thou restrain the haughty spirit in thy breast, for better far is gentle courtesy.

Homer

You will certainly not be able to take the lead in all things yourself, for to one man a god has given deeds of war, and to another the dance, to another lyre and song, and in another wide-sounding Zeus puts a good mind.

Homer

It is equally wrong to speed a guest who does not want to go, and to keep one back who is eager. You ought to make welcome the present guest, and send forth the one who wishes to go.

Homer

Thus have the gods spun the thread for wretched mortals: that they live in grief while they themselves are without cares; for two jars stand on the floor of Zeus of the gifts which he gives, one of evils and another of blessings.

Homer

He knew the things that were and the things that would be and the things that had been before.

Homer

Miserable mortals who, like leaves, at one moment flame with life, eating the produce of the land, and at another moment weakly perish.

Homer

Nothing feebler than a man does the earth raise up, of all the things which breathe and move on the earth, for he believes that he will never suffer evil in the future, as long as the gods give him success and he flourishes in his strength; but when the blessed gods bring sorrows too to pass, even these he bears, against his will, with steadfast spirit, for the thoughts of earthly men are like the day which the father of gods and men brings upon them.

Homer

It is tedious to tell again tales already plainly told.

Homer

Evil deeds do not prosper; the slow man catches up with the swift.

Homer

For rarely are sons similar to their fathers: most are worse, and a few are better than their fathers.

Homer

So it is that the gods do not give all men gifts of grace - neither good looks nor intelligence nor eloquence.

Homer

He lives not long who battles with the immortals, nor do his children prattle about his knees when he has come back from battle and the dread fray.

Homer

A councilor ought not to sleep the whole night through, a man to whom the populace is entrusted, and who has many responsibilities.

Homer

There is nothing more dread and more shameless than a woman who plans such deeds in her heart as the foul deed which she plotted when she contrived her husband's murder.

Homer

Once harm has been done, even a fool understands it.

Homer

The minds of the everlasting gods are not changed suddenly.

Homer
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